Architecture Artifacts Cross-Checker

Last time we looked at architecture metrics. We stated then that the data required for calculating these metrics could come from a variety of sources. However, we all know that information about architectures is often not kept up-to-date…

So how do you keep your metrics reliable by keeping their inputs fresh?

In order to answer a question like that it’s always good to understand the reasons diagrams and other artifacts go stale. It’s not because people are deliberately making them rot, it’s more that they have many things to do and either simply forget to update artifacts or prioritize some other activity.

To solve the first problem, a simple reminder could be all it takes. But here we run the risk of crying wolf. So we need to make sure there is something to update before we send out a reminder.

Enter the architecture artifacts cross-checker. This is a tool that compares different inputs to verify they are consistent. Let’s look at some examples of inputs such a tool could verify.

External systems in a context diagram should also appear in the corresponding container diagram. If you have a tech radar, it should list at least the technologies that are in the container diagram. Containers in a container diagram should have a corresponding process in a data flow diagram. Threat models should calculate the risk of security threats against each of those. Etc. Etc.

We may even be able to tie some of the architecture artifacts to source code.

For instance, in a micro services architecture, each service may have its own source code repository or its own directory in a monorepo. And if you have coding standards for cross-service calls, you may be able to derive at compile time which containers call which at runtime. Alternatively, this information could come from runtime call patterns collected by a service mesh. Finally, running a tool like cloc gives technologies used in the service, which should be listed in the container diagram and in the tech radar.

By combining these diverse sources of information about your system, you can detect inconsistencies automatically and send out reminders for updates. Or even fail the build, if you want to go that far.

What do you think? Would a little bit of coding effort to write an architecture artifacts cross-checker be worth it in your situation? Please leave a comment below.

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