How To Process Java Annotations

One of the cool new features of Java 8 is the support for lambda expressions. Lambda expressions lean heavily on the FunctionalInterface annotation.

In this post, we’ll look at annotations and how to process them so you can implement your own cool features.

Annotations

Annotations were added in Java 5. The Java language comes with some predefined annotations, but you can also define custom annotations.

Many frameworks and libraries make good use of custom annotations. JAX-RS, for instance, uses them to turn POJOs into REST resources.

Annotations can be processed at compile time or at runtime (or even both).

At runtime, you can use the reflection API. Each element of the Java language that can be annotated, like class or method, implements the AnnotatedElement interface. Note that an annotation is only available at runtime if it has the RUNTIME RetentionPolicy.

Compile-Time Annotation Processing

Java 5 came with the separate apt tool to process annotations, but since Java 6 this functionality is integrated into the compiler.

You can either call the compiler directly, e.g. from the command line, or indirectly, from your program.

In the former case, you specify the -processor option to javac, or you use the ServiceLoader framework by adding the file META-INF/services/javax.annotation.processing.Processor to your jar. The contents of this file should be a single line containing the fully qualified name of your processor class.

The ServiceLoader approach is especially convenient in an automated build, since all you have to do is put the annotation processor on the classpath during compilation, which build tools like Maven or Gradle will do for you.

Compile-Time Annotation Processing From Within Your Application

You can also use the compile-time tools to process annotations from within your running application.

Rather than calling javac directly, use the more convenient JavaCompiler interface. Either way, you’ll need to run your application with a JDK rather than just a JRE.

The JavaCompiler interface gives you programmatic access to the Java compiler. You can obtain an implementation of this interface using ToolProvider.getSystemJavaCompiler(). This method is sensitive to the JAVA_HOME environment variable.

The getTask() method of JavaCompiler allows you to add your annotation processor instances. This is the only way to control the construction of annotation processors; all other methods of invoking annotation processors require the processor to have a public no-arg constructor.

Annotation Processors

A processor must implement the Processor interface. Usually you will want to extend the AbstractProcessor base class rather than implement the interface from scratch.

Each annotation processor must indicate the types of annotations it is interested in through the getSupportedAnnotationTypes() method. You may return * to process all annotations.

The other important thing is to indicate which Java language version you support. Override the getSupportedSourceVersion() method and return one of the RELEASE_x constants.

With these methods implemented, your annotation processor is ready to get to work. The meat of the processor is in the process() method.

When process() returns true, the annotations processed are claimed by this processor, and will not be offered to other processors. Normally, you should play nice with other processors and return false.

Elements and TypeMirrors

The annotations and the Java elements they are present on are provided to your process() method as Element objects. You may want to process them using the Visitor pattern.

The most interesting types of elements are TypeElement for classes and interfaces (including annotations), ExecutableElement for methods, and VariableElement for fields.

Each Element points to a TypeMirror, which represents a type in the Java programming language. You can use the TypeMirror to walk the class relationships of the annotated code you’re processing, much like you would using reflection on the code running in the JVM.

Processing Rounds

Annotation processing happens in separate stages, called rounds. During each round, a processor gets a chance to process the annotations it is interested in.

The annotations to process and the elements they are present on are available via the RoundEnvironment parameter passed into the process() method.

If annotation processors generate new source or class files during a round, then the compiler will make those available for processing in the next round. This continues until no more new files are generated.

The last round contains no input, and is thus a good opportunity to release any resources the processor may have acquired.

Initializing and Configuring Processors

Annotation processors are initialized with a ProcessingEnvironment. This processing environment allows you to create new source or class files.

It also provides access to configuration in the form of options. Options are key-value pairs that you can supply on the command line to javac using the -A option. For this to work, you must return the options’ keys in the processor’s getSupportedOptions() method.

Finally, the processing environment provides some support routines (e.g. to get the JavaDoc for an element, or to get the direct super types of a type) that come in handy during processing.

Classpath Issues

To get the most accurate information during annotation processing, you must make sure that all imported classes are on the classpath, because classes that refer to types that are not available may have incomplete or altogether missing information.

When processing large numbers of annotated classes, this may lead to a problem on Windows systems where the command line becomes too large (> 8K). Even when you use the JavaCompiler interface, it still calls javac behind the scenes.

The Java compiler has a nice solution to this problem: you can use argument files that contain the arguments to javac. The name of the argument file is then supplied on the command line, preceded by @.

Unfortunately, the JavaCompiler.getTask() method doesn’t support argument files, so you’ll have to use the underlying run() method.

Remember that the getTask() approach is the only one that allows you to construct your annotation processors. If you must use argument files, then you have to use a public no-arg constructor.

If you’re in that situation, and you have multiple annotation processors that need to share a single instance of a class, you can’t pass that instance into the constructor, so you’ll be forced to use something like the Singleton pattern.

Conclusion

Annotations are an exciting technology that have lots of interesting applications. For example, I used them to extract the resources from a REST API into a resource model for further processing, like generating documentation.

I’m very interested to learn what you have used them for. Please leave a comment below.

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REST Messages And Data Transfer Objects

In Patterns of Enterprise Application Architecture, Martin Fowler defines a Data Transfer Object (DTO) as

An object that carries data between processes in order to reduce the number of method calls.

Note that a Data Transfer Object is not the same as a Data Access Object (DAO), although they have some similarities. A Data Access Object is used to hide details from the underlying persistence layer.

REST Messages Are Serialized DTOs

message-transferIn a RESTful architecture, the messages sent across the wire are serializations of DTOs.

This means all the best practices around DTOs are important to follow when building RESTful systems.

For instance, Fowler writes

…encapsulate the serialization mechanism for transferring data over the wire. By encapsulating the serialization like this, the DTOs keep this logic out of the rest of the code and also provide a clear point to change serialization should you wish.

In other words, you should follow the DRY principle and have exactly one place where you convert your internal DTO to a message that is sent over the wire.

In JAX-RS, that one place should be in an entity provider. In Spring, the mechanism to use is the message converter. Note that both frameworks have support for several often-used serialization formats.

Following this advice not only makes it easier to change media types (e.g. from plain JSON or HAL to a more mature media type like Siren, Mason, or UBER). It also makes it easy to support multiple media types.

mediaThis in turn enables you to switch media types without breaking clients.

You can continue to serve old clients with the old media type, while new clients can take advantage of the new media type.

Introducing new media types is one way to evolve your REST API when you must make backwards incompatible changes.

DTOs Are Not Domain Objects

Domain objects implement the ubiquitous language used by subject matter experts and thus are discovered. DTOs, on the other hand, are designed to meet certain non-functional characteristics, like performance, and are subject to trade-offs.

This means the two have very different reasons to change and, following the Single Responsibility Principle, should be separate objects. Blindly serializing domain objects should thus be considered an anti-pattern.

That doesn’t mean you must blindly add DTOs, either. It’s perfectly fine to start with exposing domain objects, e.g. using Spring Data REST, and introducing DTOs as needed. As always, premature optimization is the root of all evil, and you should decide based on measurements.

The point is to keep the difference in mind. Don’t change your domain objects to get better performance, but rather introduce DTOs.

DTOs Have No Behavior

big-dataA DTO should not have any behavior; it’s purpose in life is to transfer data between remote systems.

This is very different from domain objects.

There are two basic approaches for dealing with the data in a DTO.

The first is to make them immutable objects, where all the input is provided in the constructor and the data can only be read.

This doesn’t work well for large objects, and doesn’t play nice with serialization frameworks.

The better approach is to make all the properties writable. Since a DTO must not have logic, this is one of the few occasions where you can safely make the fields public and omit the getters and setters.

Of course, that means some other part of the code is responsible for filling the DTO with combinations of properties that together make sense.

Conversely, you should validate DTOs that come back in from the client.

How To Implement Input Validation For REST resources

rest-validationThe SaaS platform I’m working on has a RESTful interface that accepts XML payloads.

Implementing REST Resources

For a Java shop like us, it makes sense to use JAX-B to generate JavaBean classes from an XML Schema.

Working with XML (and JSON) payloads using JAX-B is very easy in a JAX-RS environment like Jersey:

@Path("orders")
public class OrdersResource {
  @POST
  @Consumes({ "application/xml", "application/json" })
  public void place(Order order) {
    // Jersey marshalls the XML payload into the Order 
    // JavaBean, allowing us to write type-safe code 
    // using Order's getters and setters.
    int quantity = order.getQuantity();
    // ...
  }
}

(Note that you shouldn’t use these generic media types, but that’s a discussion for another day.)

The remainder of this post assumes JAX-B, but its main point is valid for other technologies as well. Whatever you do, please don’t use XMLDecoder, since that is open to a host of vulnerabilities.

Securing REST Resources

Let’s suppose the order’s quantity is used for billing, and we want to prevent people from stealing our money by entering a negative amount.

We can do that with input validation, one of the most important tools in the AppSec toolkit. Let’s look at some ways to implement it.

Input Validation With XML Schema

xml-schemaWe could rely on XML Schema for validation, but XML Schema can only validate so much.

Validating individual properties will probably work fine, but things get hairy when we want to validate relations between properties. For maximum flexibility, we’d like to use Java to express constraints.

More importantly, schema validation is generally not a good idea in a REST service.

A major goal of REST is to decouple client and server so that they can evolve separately.

If we validate against a schema, then a new client that sends a new property would break against an old server that doesn’t understand the new property. It’s usually better to silently ignore properties you don’t understand.

JAX-B does this right, and also the other way around: properties that are not sent by an old client end up as null. Consequently, the new server must be careful to handle null values properly.

Input Validation With Bean Validation

bean-validationIf we can’t use schema validation, then what about using JSR 303 Bean Validation?

Jersey supports Bean Validation by adding the jersey-bean-validation jar to your classpath.

There is an unofficial Maven plugin to add Bean Validation annotations to the JAX-B generated classes, but I’d rather use something better supported and that works with Gradle.

So let’s turn things around. We’ll handcraft our JavaBean and generate the XML Schema from the bean for documentation:

@XmlRootElement(name = "order")
public class Order {
  @XmlElement
  @Min(1)
  public int quantity;
}
@Path("orders")
public class OrdersResource {
  @POST
  @Consumes({ "application/xml", "application/json" })
  public void place(@Valid Order order) {
    // Jersey recognizes the @Valid annotation and
    // returns 400 when the JavaBean is not valid
  }
}

Any attempt to POST an order with a non-positive quantity will now give a 400 Bad Request status.

Now suppose we want to allow clients to change their pending orders. We’d use PATCH or PUT to update individual order properties, like quantity:

@Path("orders")
public class OrdersResource {
  @Path("{id}")
  @PUT
  @Consumes("application/x-www-form-urlencoded")
  public Order update(@PathParam("id") String id, 
      @Min(1) @FormParam("quantity") int quantity) {
    // ...
  }
}

We need to add the @Min annotation here too, which is duplication. To make this DRY, we can turn quantity into a class that is responsible for validation:

@Path("orders")
public class OrdersResource {
  @Path("{id}")
  @PUT
  @Consumes("application/x-www-form-urlencoded")
  public Order update(@PathParam("id") String id, 
      @FormParam("quantity")
      Quantity quantity) {
    // ...
  }
}
@XmlRootElement(name = "order")
public class Order {
  @XmlElement
  public Quantity quantity;
}
public class Quantity {
  private int value;

  public Quantity() { }

  public Quantity(String value) {
    try {
      setValue(Integer.parseInt(value));
    } catch (ValidationException e) {
      throw new IllegalArgumentException(e);
    }
  }

  public int getValue() {
    return value;
  }

  @XmlValue
  public void setValue(int value) 
      throws ValidationException {
    if (value < 1) {
      throw new ValidationException(
          "Quantity value must be positive, but is: " 
          + value);
    }
    this.value = value;
  }
}

We need a public no-arg constructor for JAX-B to be able to unmarshall the payload into a JavaBean and another constructor that takes a String for the @FormParam to work.

setValue() throws javax.xml.bind.ValidationException so that JAX-B will stop unmarshalling. However, Jersey returns a 500 Internal Server Error when it sees an exception.

We can fix that by mapping validation exceptions onto 400 status codes using an exception mapper. While we’re at it, let’s do the same for IllegalArgumentException:

@Provider
public class DefaultExceptionMapper 
    implements ExceptionMapper<Throwable> {

  @Override
  public Response toResponse(Throwable exception) {
    Throwable badRequestException 
        = getBadRequestException(exception);
    if (badRequestException != null) {
      return Response.status(Status.BAD_REQUEST)
          .entity(badRequestException.getMessage())
          .build();
    }
    if (exception instanceof WebApplicationException) {
      return ((WebApplicationException)exception)
          .getResponse();
    }
    return Response.serverError()
        .entity(exception.getMessage())
        .build();
  }

  private Throwable getBadRequestException(
      Throwable exception) {
    if (exception instanceof ValidationException) {
      return exception;
    }
    Throwable cause = exception.getCause();
    if (cause != null && cause != exception) {
      Throwable result = getBadRequestException(cause);
      if (result != null) {
        return result;
      }
    }
    if (exception instanceof IllegalArgumentException) {
      return exception;
    }
    if (exception instanceof BadRequestException) {
      return exception;
    }
    return null;
  }

}

Input Validation By Domain Objects

dddEven though the approach outlined above will work quite well for many applications, it is fundamentally flawed.

At first sight, proponents of Domain-Driven Design (DDD) might like the idea of creating the Quantity class.

But the Order and Quantity classes do not model domain concepts; they model REST representations. This distinction may be subtle, but it is important.

DDD deals with domain concepts, while REST deals with representations of those concepts. Domain concepts are discovered, but representations are designed and are subject to all kinds of trade-offs.

For instance, a collection REST resource may use paging to prevent sending too much data over the wire. Another REST resource may combine several domain concepts to make the client-server protocol less chatty.

A REST resource may even have no corresponding domain concept at all. For example, a POST may return 202 Accepted and point to a REST resource that represents the progress of an asynchronous transaction.

ubiquitous-languageDomain objects need to capture the ubiquitous language as closely as possible, and must be free from trade-offs to make the functionality work.

When designing REST resources, on the other hand, one needs to make trade-offs to meet non-functional requirements like performance, scalability, and evolvability.

That’s why I don’t think an approach like RESTful Objects will work. (For similar reasons, I don’t believe in Naked Objects for the UI.)

Adding validation to the JavaBeans that are our resource representations means that those beans now have two reasons to change, which is a clear violation of the Single Responsibility Principle.

We get a much cleaner architecture when we use JAX-B JavaBeans only for our REST representations and create separate domain objects that handle validation.

Putting validation in domain objects is what Dan Bergh Johnsson refers to as Domain-Driven Security.

cave-artIn this approach, primitive types are replaced with value objects. (Some people even argue against using any Strings at all.)

At first it may seem overkill to create a whole new class to hold a single integer, but I urge you to give it a try. You may find that getting rid of primitive obsession provides value even beyond validation.

What do you think?

How do you handle input validation in your RESTful services? What do you think of Domain-Driven Security? Please leave a comment.

Securing HTTP-based APIs With Signatures

CloudSecurityI work at EMC on a platform on top of which SaaS solutions can be built.

This platform has a RESTful HTTP-based API, just like a growing number of other applications.

With development frameworks like JAX-RS, it’s relatively easy to build such APIs.

It is not, however, easy to build them right.

Issues With Building HTTP-based APIs

The problem isn’t so much in getting the functionality out there. We know how to develop software and the available REST/HTTP frameworks and libraries make it easy to expose the functionality.

That’s only half the story, however. There are many more -ilities to consider.

rest-easyThe REST architectural style addresses some of those, like scalability and evolvability.

Many HTTP-based APIs today claim to be RESTful, but in fact are not. This means that they are not reaping all of the benefits that REST can bring.

I’ll be talking more about how to help developers meet all the constraints of the REST architectural style in future posts.

Today I want to focus on another non-functional aspect of APIs: security.

Security of HTTP-based APIs

In security, we care about the CIA-triad: Confidentiality, Integrity, and availability.

Availability of web services is not dramatically different from that of web applications, which is relatively well understood. We have our clusters, load balancers, and what not, and usually we are in good shape.

Confidentiality and integrity, on the other hand, both require proper authentication, and here matters get more interesting.

Authentication of HTTP-based APIs

authenticationFor authentication in an HTTP world, it makes sense to look at HTTP Authentication.

This RFC describes Basic and Digest authentication. Both have their weaknesses, which is why you see many APIs use alternatives.

Luckily, these alternatives can use the same basic machinery defined in the RFC. This machinery includes status code 401 Unauthorized, and the WWW-Authenticate, Authentication-Info, and Authorization headers. Note that the Authorization header is unfortunately misnamed, since it’s used for authentication, not authorization.

The final piece of the puzzle is the custom authentication scheme. For example, Amazon S3 authentication uses the AWS custom scheme.

Authentication of HTTP-based APIs Using Signatures

The AWS scheme relies on signatures. Other services, like EMC Atmos, use the same approach.

It is therefore good to see that a new IETF draft has been proposed to standardize the use of signatures in HTTP-based APIs.

Standardization enables the construction of frameworks and libraries, which will drive down the cost of implementing authentication and will make it easier to build more secure APIs.

What do you think?

what-do-you-thinkIf you’re in the HTTP API building and/or consuming business –and who isn’t these days– then please go ahead and read the draft and provide feedback.

I’m also interested in your experiences with building or consuming secure HTTP APIs. Please leave a comment on this post.